Gilbourne Trees

including Gillborn, Gilborn, Gilborne, Gilbourn, Gilburn etc


Latest update - October 2016

Earlier updates

The Name

Gilbourne is a relatively uncommon name, based on England's East Midlands in the 19th and 20th Centuries, but in earlier times based in the counties of Kent and Yorkshire.   From Yorkshire, they also spread to Ireland, and from Ireland to the United States of America, and Australia. The name also occurs in Jamaica - probably originating from a single planter, whose origins are unknown. The source of the name is unclear. There is a village of Golborne near Warrington in Lancashire, but if this were the origin then the name would be expected to be common close to the village. This is not the case, the name is rarely found in the North-West of England. GOLBO(U)RNE is a name in its own right and though not common, is found in the North West. (More common in the North-West are GILLEBURN and its variants. As yet this has not been regarded as a variant of GILBOURNE, though one branch of GILLIBURN in the North East did change its name and become GILBURN.) The name may also have evolved from the more common name KILBO(U)RNE, which is itself based on the place name KILBURN. There are three villages with this name - one in North London, one in North Yorkshire , and the third in Derbyshire. The last two of these are respectively near the origins of Tree 8 and Trees 1 & 2, and either or both could be the origin of the name.

Many of the families listed in these pages do not (yet?) have proven links to our family, although it is difficult to believe, for instance, that trees 1 and 2, both based in Nottinghamshire, are unrelated. It will probably take DNA testing to prove whether links exist. Similarly, the migration from Yorkshire and London to Ireland is found only from the tree drawn by Sir William Betham, based on the tree given in the Visitation of Kent, and now lodged in the Irish Archives. No modern day descendants of the London based family are known so even DNA testing may not be possible to prove this. If you are a Gilbourne (or Gilburn, Gillborn, Gilborne or Gilbourn) and would be prepared to take part in a DNA comparison then I would love to hear from you.

Although the earliest known family structures are those from Erswick, Yorkshire, given in the Visitation of Kent, the earliest known occurrence of the name occurs in the Annals of Nottinghamshire, where it is recorded for 1310 that "William Gilburn and John Lambok, burgesses, elected to serve in parliament."

There are numerous individuals whose exact place on the tree is not known. Most of them will probably link to the following families, though two instances are known where immigrants have adopted the name, one a Gilborn, the other a Gilburn.

Tree 1. Descendants of Robert GILBURN and Elizabeth Phillips.

GILBOURNE count: 328
This couple baptised at least 6 children between 1768 and 1785 in Duffield, Derbyshire. They are the start of our Gilbourne ancestors, and all Tudors, Griffins, Bevans, Reeve etc link into this tree.  The family only remained in Duffield for one generation, probably coming from Staffordshire.  Not all of the children have been traced but Samuel Gilborne moved to Brinsley in Notts, and there were still some of his descendants in the same village 200 years later.
(Clicking the link to this section will take you out of the One Name Study and into our own family tree.)

Tree 2. Descendants of Richard GILBOURNE and Margaret.

GILLBORN count: 149
This couple baptised in Lenton, Notts, 5 children before Richard's death in 1733.  It is from this branch of the family that all the Gillborn surnames originate.  It is difficult to imagine that these first two trees, both originating in Nottinghamshire are not related, but no link has yet been found.

Tree 3. Descendants of Francis GILBORN and Mary Joyce.

GILBORN birth count: 21
No birth or christening record has yet been found for Francis Gilborn, and the first record is the marriage of the couple in Nottingham in 1781.  A baptism in Nottingham St. Mary church on 19 July 1755 has been transcribed by Notts F.H.S. as 'Francis, son of Ann TILMAN'.  It is possible that it is JILMAN, but inspection of the register proved inconclusive.  GILBORN has been recorded as JILBORN and GIL(L)MAN on a number of occasions. It is very likely that Francis should be linked to Tree 2, but this cannot be proved. 

Francis Tilman/Jilman baptismal registration

Decide for yourself whether this is the baptism of Francis Jilman or Francis Tilman. The highlighted portions show other instances of 'J' and 'T' on the same page. My opinion is that there is usually space between the upright and line across the top of the 'T', whereas the J is continuous, and therefore Ann is more likely to be Jilman than Tilman.

Francis and Mary  registered the births of 8 children. This is a relatively short tree.  Although not all descendants have yet been traced, the Gilborn name in this branch seems to have ended in the mid 1800s.

Tree 4. Descendants of William GILBORN and Esther Campbell.

GILBORN birth count: 20
The smallest tree on the site, just five generations before the name Gilborn was lost. William Gilborn was a marine who married Esther Campbell 28 Jun 1761 in Plymouth, Devon. William's birth has not been traced but the couple had at least four children in Plymouth. Only one has been traced, Andrew was also a marine, and present on the first fleet (of convicts) who sailed to Australia. Andrew Gilborn's son William Prideaux was one of the first births to be registered in New South Wales. It is possible that this tree links into the Irish families of Tree 6, but it is also possible that they originated in the Lambeth area of London as this is where William Prideaux GILBORN and his children eventually lived.
Samuel GILBORN was buried in Lambeth St. Mary 2 January 1791 and Rebecca GILBORN 1 November 1792. Could they have been Andrew's siblings; or his father's siblings? More likely is that they were husband and wife, though Samuel of course could still be related to William. No birth or marriage record of Samuel has been found. He died in St. Thomas's Hospital after being admitted with 'bleeding'. Unfortunately, this record also does not contain his age.

There are a number of records relating to Gilborns in the registers of Plymouth and East Stonehouse that cannot be accurately assigned. Both of these adjacent parishes have large numbers of military personnel, who moved about with their regiments, making tracking them difficult. The extracts from the registers have been listed on a separate page and their likely linkage discussed. It includes the possibility that Esther Campbell was William's second wife.

Tree 5. Descendants of John Hornby GILBOURNE and Mary Ann Clarke.

GILBOURNE birth count: 73
This is the origin of a Gilbourne family that emigrated to Australia being investigated by Graham Wright, who supplied much of the Australian descendant information included here.
Sarah Mary and John Hornsby [sic] Gilborne were both christened in St. Catherine, Jamaica, the illegitimate children of Elizabeth Selvin, a 'free negro'. The children were specified as 'mulatto' - i.e. their father, unnamed in the record, was white, and presumably a Gilborne. Few Gilborne's are known in Jamaica at this time. Richard Gilborne and his wife Jane had two children about the same time as Elizabeth Selvin had hers. Richard's birthplace in unknown, but a more likely father is John Gilbourn or one of his sons. John married L___via Hornsbie at St. Dorothy 30 June 1751. and surely must be linked to John Hornsby Gilborne. There are two baptisms in the Jamaican registers that are possibly children of John: Thomas Garland Gilborne at St. John in 1757, and Mark Gilborne at St. Dorothy in 1767. Regrettably, parents names are not given in the baptismal records of either child. Later records give Elizabeth Selvin's son John's middle name as Hornby. He married Mary Ann Clarke and raised seven children Their grandson, William Daniel GILBOURNE was a seaman who married Mary Philomena (Minnie) JOHNSON (nee Jordan) in Rhyl, North Wales in 1881, but all their known children were born in Australia. After Daniel's death Minnie and her daughter Lydia later emigrated again, this time to San Francisco, U.S.A. William's brother, Philip William, also emigrated to Australia.
Allen Fitzpatrick GILBOURNE who emigrated from Jamaica to the United States in 1912 also links to this tree.

Tree 6.  Descendants of Edward and Frances GILBORNE of Queens County, Ireland

GILBORNE birth count: 61
Thanks for help in the compilation of this tree must go to Carolyn Badcock, a descendant of Eyre Gilbourne, who lives in Australia. Edward Gilborne's parents are possibly Thomas Gilborne and the former Margaret Vicars, who married in 1706. Many of the male members of this family enlisted in the British army, and while stationed in England they appear there in censuses and birth, marriage and death records.  Much of the detail of their lives has been garnered from newspapers, particularly The (London) Times.  A deal of informtion has also been gleaned from LDS film of Registry Deeds lodged in the National Library of Ireland. A summary of the deeds consulted is given here. The Gilborne name is believed to be now extinct as a surname in the known branch of the family, the last bearing the name being Ethel S. Gilbourne who died in New York May 1974. Richard Charles Gilborne, who died in 1945, was the last known descendant of William Percival Gilborne but William wrote in December 1801:

 "I have a numerous family who depend for support, and their promotion in life, solely on the emoluments of my present office. My eldest son, a young man of nineteen years of age ..."

Only for children are known, and they were born over a period of 18 years. It seems there are several children still to be found.

It is likely that Charles Gilborne belonged to this family, but this has not yet been conclusively proved. (He and his descendants are included in the count of the name in this tree.) His daughter Louisa Elizabeth married Thomas William Sixsmith in Dublin in 1860. Their grandson, Eric Keir Gilborne Sixsmith was born in Cardiff in 1904 and after joining The Cameronians in 1924 rose to become Assistant Chief of Staff, (Organisation and Training), Supreme Headquarters, Allied Powers, Europe 1957-1961, retiring in 1961.

The Gilbourne name in Ireland is being researched by Patrick Hughes, who believes that one branch can be traced back to Sir Nicholas Gilbourne and his family in Charing, Kent in the 1600s (Tree 8). Patrick himself belongs to tree 9.

Tree 7. Gilbournes in the U.S.A.

GILBORNE / GILBURN / GILBORN etc. count: 189 (This count is likely to fall as immigrant families are added to the trees of their native countries.)
The majority of these families immigrated to the U.S.A in the 19th and early 20th century, particularly from Ireland, and as such could be expected ultimately to belong to other trees.  However not all came from Ireland,  Lydia Gilbourne, who married William Podesta in San Francisco, came from Australia with her mother, who had been born in England. Her father had been born in Jamaica, so Lydia is included in Tree 5.

Henry J Gilborne was not an immigrant himself, being born in New York about 1805. His forbears, of course, would have been immigrants, almost certainly from England or Ireland, but this is still to be proved. He married Mary Buie in Tattnall, Georgia in 1825. Three children are known, Eliza, born in Gdsden County, Florida in 1826,Henry Jefferson, born in Georgia in 1835, and David M, born in Florida in 1839. He was living in Quincy, Gadsden, Florida before war broke out, when he enlisted the Confederate Army in 'C' Co. of the 6th Florida Infantry. The couple are at the head of a large tree that still lives in Georgia today.

Those coming from Ireland are:
Michael Patrick Gilbourne (sometimes Michael D.) of Utah - included in tree 9.

Robert Alexander Gilbourne entered the U.S. in 1875. He married Canada-born Sarah McLean about 1880 before moving first to Chicago then Brooklyn, N.Y. Two daughters and a son were born in Chicago, but the son also died there in his infancy. Robert has been identified as the son of Eyre and Jane Gilbourne, and hence is shown in Tree 6.

James Gilborne came from Ireland in the first half of the 19th century with his seven children. His wife's name is not known, and may have died in Ireland. He settled in Cherry Valley, Otsego, N.Y., where he died in 1848.

William Gilborne and Hannah Harris and their children also came from Ireland in the mid 1800s and settled first in upstate New York before three of their five known children moved West, settling in Illinois and South Dakota. What became of William and Hannah is not known.

William and Margaret Gilbourne, who died in Rock Run, Stephenson, Il, in 1867 and 1879 respectively. William is possible the father of the previous five siblings. If this is the case then Margaret must be a second wife, as Henry Gilborne's mother is known to be Hannah.. A farmer and physician, William and his wife are buried in Irish Grove Catholic Cemetery. William had been born in Dublin about 1800. As yet there is no evidence of any relationship to the five siblings, but living in close proximity to the brothers, and one of the brothers also being a physician gives some cause for thought.

William and Eliza Gilborn, as mentiond above, were recorded as Gilborin in Root, Montgomery, N.Y. in 1860, with daughter Mary E, and a James Gilborn with them. James is unlikely to be their son, as he is known to have a sister Mary A., and William and Margaret are unlikely to have two children called Mary - unless one was adopted. William had been born in Ireland about 1807. Eliza was a widow by 1875, still living in Sharon. Her death, some time after 1880 has not been traced.
Mary E Gilborne married Leander Lehman about 1863, and son Rozell was born two years later. they lived in Sharon, Scoharie, N.Y.

Two Siblings of unknown parents lived in New York City.

Robert Gilburn came from Limerick in 1885. He married Mary Bowen in Cook County, Illinois, before settling in Buchanan, Missouri, where they raised seven children.

Thomas Gilburn, born in Ireland about 1837, was with his wife, the former Margaret Carry (or Carrey), and daughter Mary in Chicago in 1880. A daughter Susanna had been born in 1878, but nothing of her has been found after. A son, Thomas, had been born in 1879, but died in May 1880, just before the census was taken. Both parents had died by 1883, and when Mary married Raymond Lynch 18 April 1907, the Gilburn name died out in this branch of the tree. a daughter, Margaret, was born in 1909. Mary died in 1930 in Kalamazoo, Michigan.

Thomas Gilburns, also known as Gilbourne, was born in Ireland in 1867, and entered the U.S.A. in 1885. He married Nora Ward in 1895 in Manhattan. Nora had also been born in Ireland, in 1871. Nine children of the couple are known, all born in Jersey City, New Jersey. The 1900 census indicates another child had died in infancy.

Edward Gilbourne was born in Ireland about 1811. It is not known when he came to the U.S.A., nor whether he married his wife, Jane, in Ireland or America. Their only known child was daughter Frances, born in New York, probably in Saratoga County, in 1841. Jane died in 1859 and is buried in Ballston Spa Cemetery. Edward remarried to Abbie J Black and another daughter, Abbie B. Gilbourne, was born about 1874. Edward died in 1878 when he "was found dead in a water tank into which he had fallen head first, so that he was unable to get out."
Frances Gilbourne became a teacher in Albany, N.Y. She never married and taught in public school 2 for 46 years. She died in 1924 and is buried in Balston Spa.
Abbie Gilbourne married first a Trim(m). No record of her husband has been found, but in 1892 Abbie G Trim was resident with Mrs. H.B. Trim in Saratoga Springs. Abbie became the fourth wife of Frederick D. Arnold in 1920. She died in 1940 and is buried in Stillwater Union Cemetery, Saratoga, N.Y.

Tree 8. The tree of Sir Nicholas GILBOURNE of Charing, Kent.

Gilbourne Count: 123
This tree starts in Yorkshire, before moving to Kent and London,  and later to Ireland too. It is expected that tree 6 will be linked to this tree, but the link cannot yet be proved.
*** Tree 8 is constructed largely from secondary and tertiary sources, some of which disagree with each other, and much is still to be verified.  As such, much of it should be regarded as provisional. ***

The older parts of the tree are largely that from the Visitation of Kent, 1619 (p.152), with additions from the tree constructed by Sir William Betham held in the National Archives of Ireland. Betham's trees contain information from sources that were later destroyed in a fire. Later additions have been made by this author using Church records, civil registration and Census records.

Tree 9. Descendants of Robert GILBOURNE and Johannah MEEHAN

GILBOURNE birth count: 48
This couple married in Mahoonagh, Co. Limerick, Ireland 26 Jul 1822. Their descendants were concentrated around Ballinarouga, Limerick, for many years. but individuals later migrated to France and the U.S.A.  Patrick Hughes has provided the details for most of this tree, with additions from parish records.

'Tree 0.' Family Groups whose tree is unknown

GILBOURNE etc count: 410
These indiviiduals are not really a tree, but are grouped together here simply because it is not known to which tree they belong, or if the tree is reasonably obvious, it is not known just how they are linked. A summary of the family groups is given here.

Copyright Angela and Dai Bevan 2000-2017


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