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LOCAL NEWS - APRIL 2001

Waxwing at Vauxhall Holiday Park, Great Yarmouth

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS:
Thanks to all of the following who have contributed to this page during 2001: Peter Allard, Chris & Alison Allen, Chris Baker, Leslie Batchelder, Derek Beamish, Kevin Blowers, James Brown, Tim Brown, Jon Burrell, Roger Conner, Matthew Deans, Andrew Easton, Ricky Fairhead, Jenny Gort, John Grant, Lee Gregory, Dave Holman, Robert Holmes, Colin Jacobs, Mike Marsh, Don & Gwen Moore, Rob Murray, Chris Mutimer, Peter Napthine, Peter Ransome, Jim Read, Neville Skinner, Brian Small, Richard Smith, David Walsh, Jon Warnes, Steve & Jane Whiteside, Robert Wilton, Robert Wincup, James Wright, Peter Wright, Jack Wylson & anyone we have inadvertently missed.

Year 2000 Review Current News


Please feel free to e-mail any sightings from the Lowestoft area to us at loungedweller@hotmail.com
 

A review of January to May 2001 be viewed by clicking here.

WEEK ENDED MAY 6, 2001

MIGRANT WARBLERS ARE AROUND IN very good numbers at the moment. The scrub at Kessingland sewage works was buzzing with singing Sylvia warblers on April 30th. Whitethroats, S. communis, are present in good numbers as are Blackcaps, S. atricapilla, Lesser Whitethroats, S. curruca, were also recorded and a Reed Warbler, Acrocephalus scirpaceus, joined the many Sedge, A. schoenobaenus, that have been present for some time.

Hen Harrier Circus cyaneus
A probable male was seen from a train at Fisher Row, Oulton on the 30th.

Common Sandpiper Actitis hypoleucos
One was feeding on the filter beds at Kessingland sewage works from April 30th - May 1st.

Common Swift Apus apus
Seen at several places on the 30th with a few birds present at breeding sites.

Yellow Wagtail
Motacilla (flava) flavissima
Five were present at Kessingland sewage works on the 30th.

BLUE-HEADED WAGTAIL M. (flava) flava
Last weeks hybrid type 'Blue-head' was still present at Kessingland sewage works on April 30th - May 2. This bird was joined by a female and another smart hybrid Blue-headed which exhibited a very white throat on the 30th. Another male Blue-head was at Corton cliffs on May 2nd.

Whinchat
Saxicola rubetra
A male was seen briefly in horse paddocks at Corton on the 30th.

Garden Warbler
S. borin
One was at the migrant hotspot of Kessingland sewage works on the 30th.

Firecrest
Regulus ignicapillus
One visited a garden at Ash Farm, near Lowestoft on the 30th along with two Goldcrests, R. regulus.

Pied Flycatcher
Ficedula hypoleuca
The second male of the spring spent the best part of the afternoon along the entrance to Ash Farm, near Lowestoft on May 1st-4th.




WEEK ENDED APRIL 29, 2001

SOUTHERLY WINDS OVER THE LAST few days have resulted in the arrival of several summer migrants on the 25th. The star bird being a male KENTISH PLOVER, Charadrius alexandrinus, on Breydon Water, Norfolk. The bird was showing well on the tideline with numerous Ringed Plovers, C. hiaticula A male Kentish was present on Breydon Water on June 17th, 2000, so it's not inconceivable that it could be the same bird returning.

Other highlights this week have included the first BLUE-HEADED WAGTAILS, Motacilla (flava) flava, of the spring at Kessingland sewage works and Hopton golf course, a brief HAWFINCH,
Coccothraustes coccothraustes, at Gorleston and male Pied Flycatcher, Ficedula hypoleuca and Redstart, Phoenicurus phoenicurus. Numerous common migrants have been noted towards the end of the week with very good numbers of both Yellow Wagtails and Whitethroat, Sylvia communis.

Northern Fulmar Fulmarus glacialis
Good numbers continue to be seen at Ness Point, Lowestoft.

Shelduck Tadorna tadorna
A pair were at Lound Waterworks, on the 29th.

Gadwall
Anas strepera
A pair were at Lound Waterworks, from the 27th -29th.

Grey Partridge
Perdix perdix
Two were feeding in Corton churchyard, on the 29th. A fairly regular location for them.

Purple Sandpiper
Calidris maritima
2 were at Ness Point on the 23rd along with 6 Turnstone Arenaria interpres
.

Whimbrel
Numenius phaeopus
One flew over the golf course at Gunton early morning on the 23rd. A group of three flew south over Lowestoft Cemetery, early morning on the 26th.

Common Sandpiper
Actitis hypoleucos
Presumably the same bird was at Kessingland Sluice and Kessingland sewage works on the 26th.

Sandwich Tern
Sterna sandvicensis
Pairs, possibly the same, were seen off Ness Point and the North Beach, during the afternoon and evening of the 29th.

Stock Dove
Columba oenas
Ten were in feeding in fields at Corton on the 23rd. This area is a stronghold for this species locally.


Turtle Dove
Streptopelia turtur
Three arrived in off the sea at 7:30 on the 27th. This species is now sadly very scarce in the Lowestoft area during the summer.

Cuckoo
Cuculus canorus
One was on marshes on the south shore of Breydon
Water on the 25th.

Short-eared Owl
Asio flammeus
One was quartering marshes on the south shore of Breydon Water until dusk on the 25th along with a Barn Owl, Tyto alba.

Tawny Owl Strix aluco
One was calling in Warren House Wood, Lowestoft mid-morning on the 23rd.

Common Swift Apus apus
Three flew north over Sparrows Nest Park, Lowestoft early morning on the 26th, with one of them feeding in the area for about 5 minutes before moving on. On the 28th two were seen at Hopton and one was at Pakefield, and up to 20 were feeding over the marshes at Haddiscoe, Norfolk. Two were at Lound Water Works on the 29th.

Swallow
Hirundo rustica
Several flybys were noted and one or two were among Sand Martin, Riparia riparia, flocks at Corton and Kessingland Sewage Works
on the 23rd. Several more were seen on the 26-27th, with a few now showing signs of settling down.

House Martin Delichon urbica
On the 26th a single bird was seen at Ness Point, and five were at Kessingland sewage works. Three were at the later site on the 27th. Five were at Hopton and one at Kessingland on the 28th. Two were at Corton on the 29th.

Tree Pipit
Anthus trivialis
One was at the former MoD complex, Corton early morning on the 23rd.

White Wagtail
Motacilla alba
One was in fields south of the filter beds at Kessingland sewage works on the 27th.

Yellow Wagtail
M. (flava) flavissima
Four were at Corton Cliffs with one at Kessingland sewage works on the 23rd. Five were on the football field on Corton Cliffs and a singleton flew south over Lowestoft North Denes on the 24th. Five were at Gorleston golf course, with three at Kessingland Sewage Works on the 25th. Four were on the Denes Oval and two were in Kirkley Run on the 26th. Five were at Hopton on the 28th, and on the same date at least 16 were at Kessingland sewage works. One or two were flying over calling at Corton and the North Denes Camp Site on the 29th.

BLUE-HEADED WAGTAIL M. (flava) flava
Blue-headed Wagtail

The first of the spring was a male at Kessingland sewage works from the 25-29th and another male was at Hopton golf course on the 27th. Two females were at Kessingland sewage works on the 28th. The male at Kessingland is of the pale headed Syke's "M. f. beema" type. Those occurring in Britain are regarded as being hybrids resulting from mixed pairs of Yellow and Blue-headed Wagtails, rather than the real thing from the steppes of Central Asia! Some of these hybrids even display a white head, and resemble the race leucocephala from Mongolia.

Above is a videograb of the male Blue-headed Wagtail at Hopton, taken on the 27th, and below are two videograbs of the male "Syke's" type wagtail present at Kessingland since the 25th. The whole crown and nape, but in particular, the ear coverts are far paler on the "Syke's" Wagtail.

"Sykes" type wagtail"Sykes" type wagtail

Bohemian Waxwing Bombycilla garrulus
A lone straggler was still in Myrtle Close, Lowestoft on the 23rd with two nearby in Marham Road on the 25th.

COMMON NIGHTINGALE Luscinia megarhynchos
One was singing in clifftop scrub at Pakefield during the afternoon of the 28th but soon moved on. This species is very scarce in our area and Pallas's Warbler, P. proregulus, is a more frequent migrant!

Common Redstart
Phoenicurus phoenicurus
Common Redstart

A single male (pictured left) was feeding in the flowerbeds along the northern wall of the Denes Oval, Lowestoft on the 23rd.


Northern Wheatear
Oenanthe oenanthe
Two males were on Lowestoft North Denes on the 23rd with one on the 24th. One was at Corton on the 25th. On the 26th singles were at Ness Point, Gunton playing fields, Gorleston golf course, Kessingland Beach, and two were along the north shore of Hamilton Dock, Lowestoft Harbour. Single birds were at Hopton and Kessingland on the 28th. On the 29th a few more had arrived with two on Barnards Meadow, Lowestoft, two at Corton
and one on the North Denes Camp Site. Five, three females and two males, were present on the later site in the evening after heavy spells of rain in the afternoon.

Fieldfare
Turdus pilaris
One was on the Denes Oval recreation ground on the 26th.

Redwing
T. philomelos
One was in horse paddocks at Kessingland Sewage Works on the 23rd.

Sedge Warbler
A. schoenobaenus
Five were at Kessingland Sewage Works on the 23rd along with Whitethroat, S. communis, and several
Blackcaps, S. atricapilla, Chiffchaffs, Phylloscopus collybita and Willow Warblers, P. trochilus.

Reed
Warbler A. scirpaceus

The first of the spring was singing in a dyke on the south side of Breydon Water on the 25th. One was singing at Kessingland on the 28th.

Lesser Whitethroat
Sylvia curruca
Two were at Gorleston golf course on the 23rd with one on the 25th. Four were singing from clifftop scrub between Kessingland and Pakefield on the 27th. A single was at Hopton on the 28th. One was singing at Corton sewage works on the 29th.

Whitethroat S. communis
At least 20 were noted at various sites between Hopton and Kessingland on the 26th, with a minimum of 40 recorded on the 27th.

Pied Flycatcher
Ficedula hypoleuca
A male was at Kessingland sewage works on the 26th.

Brambling
Fringilla montifringilla
Two were in the northern section of Corton Woods on the 27th.

HAWFINCH Coccothraustes coccothraustes

One was present at Gorleston golf course early morning on the 23rd. The bird was watched for a short time and heard calling from the top of a tree. Unfortunately, its stay was brief. Hawfinches are extremely rare in this area and occur as migrants, with only a handful of records over the last decade they are highly prized local 'ticks'.

OTHER WILDLIFE
At least six Harbour Porpoises, Phocoena phocoena, were feeding close inshore off Pakefield, Lowestoft, on the 28th, with four off Lowestoft North Beach on the 29th.


WEEK ENDED 22 APRIL 2001

Adult Northern GannetAFTER A FRUITLESS SEARCH FOR migrants on April 21st several of the 'Lizards' met up at Ness Point at 9am to find a heavy northbound passage of seabirds already well underway, with Northern Gannet, Morus bassanus, (pictured left) being particularly well represented. At least 1,173 passed between 9:00-12:10am with one flock alone numbering 94. A further 551 passed between 12:20-14:00, by which time numbers had tailed off considerably, but with over 100 seen at various times during the afternoon after this, well over 1,800 had passed by during our watch. As in all previous cases this spring almost all were adults. The previous day total for Suffolk was 560 at Covehithe, April 16th 1994.

A continuous passage of Northern Fulmars and Kittiwakes, Rissa tridactyla, was also evident throughout the same periods, with well in excess of 100 of each seen. If this spectacle was not enough the following were also recorded: two Cormorants, Phalacrocorax carbo, 10 Dark-bellied Brent Geese, Branta bernicla, five Common Scoter, one GREAT NORTHERN DIVER, G. immer, nine Red-throated Divers, one MANX SHEARWATER, three GREAT SKUAS, Stercorarius skua, six Arctic Skuas, S. parasiticus, one POMARINE SKUA, S. pomarinus, 15 Sandwich, one Common, S. hirundo and one Arctic Tern, S. paradisaea, one Guillemot, Uria aalge, one Swallow, Hirundo rustica, and a fine pair of adult Mediterranean Gulls heading north at height. Of the ten skuas seen only the 'Pom' appeared to linger being seen in the morning and afternoon, harrying gulls on both occasions. All in all a far better seawatch than we are usually treated to in a good Autumn never mind Spring!


Red-throated Diver
Gavia stellata
Three passed north at Ness Point on the 22nd.

Northern Fulmar
Fulmarus glacialis
Good numbers continue to be seen at Ness Point, Lowestoft. On the 16th a minimum of 100 included a raft of 50 close inshore.


MANX SHEARWATER Puffinus puffinus

Following on from one on the 21st, four flew north past Ness Point during the afternoon on the 22nd including a group of three together. 'Manxies' are scarce in Lowestoft at any time of year so five in two days is pretty good.

Gannet Morus bassanus
The previous days passage had subsided but 322 north between 8:00am and 10:00am on the 22nd was still impressive. One flock was 62 strong.

Shag
  Phalacrocorax aristotelis
The wintering 2nd year bird with a white plastic leg ring roosted on the Kittiwake wall in Lowestoft Harbour on the 20th. The inscription on the ring reads JIA. This bird was ringed on the Isle of May, Scotland as a nestling in 1999.
The same bird was on the quayside at the shipyard on Lake Lothing on the 21st.

Egyptian Goose
Alopochen aegyptiacus
Two pairs were seen in Hamilton Dock, Lowestoft Harbour on the 20th. They were chasing each other around in flight around the harbour and along the South Beach amidst much noise. One pair returned to the SLP yard where they are apparently attempting to breed, the other pair landed on the South Pier.

Common Scoter
Melanitta nigra
One female flew south at Ness Point on the 22nd.

Grey Partridge Perdix perdix
Two were in cliff top fields at Corton on the 22nd.

Turnstone
Arenaria interpres
22 were feeding in Hamilton Dock on the 20th, and 60 roosted on the rock groyne at the South Pier the same evening. A few of these birds are starting to look very handsome as they develop their summer plumage, stunning birds, well worth a look!!!

Purple Sandpiper Calidris maritima
10 were at Ness Point on the 16th, with at least four there on the 21st.


Bar-tailed Godwit Limosa lapponica
Bar-tailed Godwit

 

Six flew south past at Ness Point on the 22nd and another (pictured left) was feeding along the shore at Lake Lothing. Other waders noted on the 22nd included Curlew, Numenius arquata, Oystercatcher, Haematopus ostralegus and Ringed Plover, Charadrius hiaticula.

Mediterranean Gull Larus melanocephalus
The irregular 1s
t summer individual was again at Ness Point on the 16th and 21st.

Sandwich Tern Sterna sandvicensis
Two flew north past Ness Point on the 22nd
.

Yellow Wagtail Motacilla flava
Two flew south at Ness Point on the 22nd whilst one was at Kessingland Sewage Works on the 17th with 4 on the 22nd, along with 15 Pied Wagtails, M. alba, and 2 Reed Buntings, Emberiza schoeniclus.

Bohemian Waxwing
Bombycilla garrulus
Continuing the late run of records were 3 in the Myrtle Close, Lowestoft area on the 18th.

Black Redstart
 Phoenicurus ochruros
Two were in Hamilton Dock on the 20th with two at Kessingland Sluice on the 21st.

Redwing Turdus iliacus
One was on football fields at Gunton on the 21st, with singles at Gorleston golf course and Hopton on the 22nd.

Sedge Warbler
Acrocephalus schoenobaenus
Two were singing in the reedbed at Kessingland Sewage Works on the 22nd.

Whitethroat
Sylvia communis
The first of the year locally was in song on the North Denes, Lowestoft on the 22nd with another at Kessingland Sewage Works the same day. Chiffchaff, Phylloscopus collybita, Willow Warbler, P. trochilus and Blackcap, S. atricapilla are all around in good numbers now.

Goldcrest
Regulus regulus
One feeding in brambles alongside Hamilton Dock, Lowestoft Harbour on the 21st, seemed to be the only passerine migrant around.

Brambling
Fringilla montifringilla
One was at Gorleston golf course on the 22nd.

Siskin
Carduelis spinus
A male was in song on the 22nd in Belle Vue Park, Lowestoft.

Goldfinch
C. carduelis and Linnet C. flavirostris
A few small flocks were noted heading south on the 22nd with good numbers of the later. Linnets have been a feature of this spring so far.

Corn Bunting
Miliaria calandra
One was singing at the former M.o.D. complex, Corton on the 22nd.


OTHER WILDLIFE
At least one Harbour Porpoise, Phocoena phocoena, was feeding close inshore off Ness Point, Lowestoft, on the 21-22.


WEEK ENDED 15 APRIL 2001

GREAT NORTHERN DIVER  Gavia immer
The first winter bird present since November 27th, 2000 was still present on Lake Lothing on the 15th. Once again it was towards the western end between Oulton Broad and the shipyard. Most of the pale fringed juvenile mantle feathers have now been moulted out, so it now looks much darker than when it first arrived. To read a brief history of Great Northern Divers in Lowestoft, click here.

Northern Fulmar
Fulmarus glacialis
Two south past Ness Point, on the 9th, and four north past Gunton Warren, and one past Ness Point, on the 10th. On the evening of the 12th at least 50 were loitering off Ness Point following two small fishing boats. Several were following a small fishing boat of Corton, 13th April, with ones and two's passing Ness Point the same day.
Small numbers were still passing northwards on the 14th. Up to 20 were at Ness Point throughout the day on the 15th.

Northern Gannet Morus bassanus
31 flew north past Corton in a 20 minute period on the 11th. Two adults flew north past Ness Point, 12th April. There was quite a large northbound passage throughout the day on the 13th, with 66 north past Ness Point between 12:00-12:20, and 71 between 14:15-15:00, small numbers were still passing at around 18:00, as in previous weeks almost all were adults. Small groups were again heading north 14th April. Up to 15 flew past Ness Point on the 15th.

Cormorant Phalacrocorax carbo
81 flew along the River Waveney towards Waveney Forest/Fritton at 7.45pm, on the 11th. They were either heading for Breydon Water or Fritton Lake.

Shag
  P. aristotelis
The wintering 2nd year bird with a white plastic leg ring was present on Lake Lothing on the 15th. This bird was ringed on the Isle of May, Scotland as a nestling in 1999.

Egyptian Goose Alopochen aegyptiacus
Pair of Egyptian Geese

Presumably the pair that are usually present in Hamilton Dock flew north past Ness Point on the 15th. One landed on the sea briefly before joining the other on the groynes.

The pair are pictured left in Hamilton Dock.

Shelduck Tadorna tadorna
A pair flew north past Ness Point, on the 13th.

Eider
Somateria mollissima
A female flew north past Ness Point and settled on the sea on the 15th.

Common Scoter
Melanitta nigra
One male flew north past Ness Point, on the 13th. Three flew north past Ness Point on the 15th.

Red-breasted Merganser
Mergus serrator
Drake Red-breasted Merganser

A drake was on the River Waveney near St Olaves bridge, on the 9th, it later flew along the river towards Somerleyton. Perhaps it was the same individual that was seen on Oulton Broad in March.

In addition one flew south past Ness Point, on the evening of the 9th.

Pictured left is the drake on Oulton Broad, March 10, 2001.

Goosander M. merganser
Following the Red-breasted Merganser, at St Olaves on the 9th, the same observer was treated to a drake Goosander on the River Waveney there on the 12th.

Sanderling
Calidris alba
Three were feeding in Hamilton Dock, the 13th.

Purple Sandpiper
C. maritima
A single bird was at Ness Point, on the 12th and 13th. Four were there on the 14th. Eight were on the jetty at Ness Point on the 15th.

Eurasian Woodcock
Scolopax rusticola
One was flushed along the old railway line at Corton, the 13th.

Eurasian Curlew
Numenius arquata
Two flew north past Corton Cliffs on the 13th.

POMARINE SKUA Stercorarius pomarinus
A first summer bird was watched for 20 minutes off Corton Cliffs on the 13th. The bird was harrying gulls which were following a small fishing vessel north as it headed towards Yarmouth Harbour. Several Fulmar and 8 Gannets joined the melee of 500+ gulls that swarmed around the boat. It occasionally settled on the sea between attacks.

Sand Martin
Riparia riparia
Around sixty were prospecting nest holes at Corton, on the 12th. None at all were seen there on the 13th, they obviously didn't like the cold north-easterly wind. We didn't think much of it either!

Swallow Hirundo rustica
Two flew north at Corton, on the 11th, and one north at Lound on the 13th. Do two Swallows make a summer?

Yellow Wagtail Motacilla flava
Two were at Kessingland Sewage Works, on the 11th, with one still there on the 12th, 13th and 15th.

Bohemian Waxwing
Bombycilla garrulus
Bohemian Waxwing flock.




One was still at Laxfield Way, Lowestoft, on the 9th, and fifteen were perched on aerials in Claydon Drive, Lowestoft, on the 14th.

The videograb to the left shows part of the flock at Claydon Drive.


Black Redstart Phoenicurus ochruros
The regular pair were along Hamilton Road, on the 10th with the male singing on the 15th. One young male was singing at Ness Point, despite the cold conditions, from the 13th-15th.

Sedge Warbler Acrocephalus schoenobaenus
A single bird was still singing near Kessingland Sewage Works, on the 11th, having been present since the 1st.

Chiffchaff Phylloscopus collybita
The individual giving a very sharp disyllabic call in Warrenhouse Wood on the 9th, was still present and calling well on the 10th. Whilst 'Siberian' Chiffchaff, P.c. tristis, was considered, it was judged to be a normal Chiffchaff with an atypical call.

Willow Warbler P. trochilus
Three were singing at Herringfleet, on the 9th, and one at Gorleston Golf Course on the 10th. Four were at Hopton on the 12th. One was singing in Leathes Ham on the 14th and 15th.

Siskin Carduelis spinus
Two flew north at Hopton, on the 12th.

Linnet C. cannabina
A flock of 90 were feeding on the Denes Oval on the 12th.


OTHER WILDLIFE

On the 13th a Stoat, Mustela erminea, ran across the at Stirrups Lane, Corton. After glaring at the observers it promptly disappeared down a hole at the base of a tree.

2 Harbour PorpoisesHarbour Porpoise

At least three Harbour Porpoises, Phocoena phocoena, were feeding close inshore along Lowestoft North Beach and off Ness Point, 14th April, at left are a couple of videograbs of them.

This species is fairly regular offshore here.



WEEK ENDED 08 APRIL 2001

Red-throated Diver Gavia stellata
One past Ness Point, on the 4th.

GREAT NORTHERN DIVER  G. immer
The first winter bird present since November 27th, 2000 remained on Lake Lothing, Lowestoft until the 1st at least. It generally frequented the western end of the waterway, between the shipyard area and Oulton Broad. Although on the March 31, it was to the east near the red mooring bollard in mid channel. Most of the juvenile mantle feathers have now been moulted out. To read a brief history of Great Northern Divers in Lowestoft, click here.

Northern Fulmar
Fulmarus glacialis
Three past Ness Point, on the 4th, and seven north past there on the 6th in two hours. A party of four flew north there on the 8th.

Northern Gannet Morus bassanus
125 flew north past Ness Point between 10:00-1030am, on the 4th. A further 41 flew north past there on the 6th, with 27 on the 7th. Three were fishing far out to sea off Ness Point on the 8th.

Shag  Phalacrocorax aristotelis
One colour ringed bird in Hamilton Dock, most days up to the 3rd at least.

BITTERN Botaurus stellaris
One watched flying south, at a height of about 200 feet, past the North Denes and Ness Point at 11:00am on the 8th was probably the most unexpected bird so far this spring. You just never know what to expect!

Egyptian Goose
Alopochen aegyptiacus
A pair were again feeding in Hamilton Dock on the 1st. They are becoming increasingly common within the town itself.

Common Scoter Melanitta nigra
One past Ness Point, on the 4th.

Sparrowhawk Accipiter nisus
Pairs were displaying over Warrenhouse Wood and Sparrows Nest Park on the 7th.

Common Buzzard
Buteo buteo
One flew north over Kessingland Sewage Works, on the 1st.

ROUGH-LEGGED BUZZARD B. lagopus
Rough-legged Buzzard

One flew over Lound on the 8th and headed in the direction of Haddiscoe, it was presumably the bird usually seen on the marshes between Haddiscoe and Thorpe, Norfolk

At left is a videograb of this bird as it hovered high above us, although the digital zooming has resulted in a lot of detail being lost, the white tail with broad blackish terminal band is still very obvious.

Red-legged Partridge Alectoris rufa
One on the Euroscope and rocks at Ness Point, on the 6th, was quite a surprise. Though it is not the first time that this species has been seen in the area.

Knot
Calidris canutus
One was feeding in Hamilton Dock on the 8th, accompanied by 14 Turnstone, Arenaria interpres, three Sanderling, C. alba, and a Ringed Plover, Charadrius hiaticula.

Purple Sandpiper 
C. maritima
Purple Sandpiper

11 were at Ness Point, on the 3rd, with at least nine on the 5th, and three on the 8th.

Pictured left is one of the Purple Sand's feeding in Hamilton Dock.

Common Snipe Gallinago gallinago
Nineteen were feeding in a field at Mutford on the 2nd April.

Mediterranean Gull  Larus melanocephalus
An adult was at Ness Point on the 1st, with two adults and a first summer there on the 3rd. The first summer was still present on the 4th.

Common Tern Sterna hirundo
One flew south past Ness Point, on the 2nd.

Kingfisher Alcedo atthis
One was flying around and calling at Leathes Ham on the 8th.

SHORE LARK Eremophila alpestris
A single flew south at Lowestoft North Beach on the 1st.

Sand Martin
Riparia riparia
Eleven were feeding along the cliffs at Corton on the 1st, increasing to 14 on the 2nd, 25 on the 7th and about 50 on the 8th. Fifty were feeding at Kessingland sewage works, on the 3rd.

Swallow
Hirundo rustica
Two over Fritton Lake and a single at Corton sewage works on the 2nd; six were at Kessingland sewage works on the 3rd; one flew north along Lowestoft North Beach on the 7th and one flew north at Corton sewage works on the 8th.

Yellow Wagtail Motacilla flava
One flew north over Lowestoft North Beach, on the 1st, with another flying in from the sea between Corton and Hopton, on the 2nd.

White Wagtail
Motacilla alba alba
Single birds were seen at Kessingland Beach and at Corton Sewage Works, on the 1st. Four were in fields at Mutford, and singles at Corton sewage Works and the Denes Oval on the 2nd. On the 3rd one was at Kessingland sewage works.
Three Pied/White Wagtails seen flying in from the sea at Ness Point, on the 7th, were probably White Wagtails, though they were too far away to completely rule out Pied.

Bohemian Waxwing Bombycilla garrulus
A flock of 30 were again in Bell Lane, Belton,on the 3rd. Three were in Laxfield Way, Lowestoft on the 7th, with two remaining on the 8th.

Black Redstart Phoenicurus ochruros
One female was at Corton Church, and two males and two females were in the Hamilton Dock area on the 1st. A male was seen along Lake Lothing on the 3rd. On the 8th a pair were again around Hamilton Dock, and a young male was singing near the railway footbridge along Lake Lothing.

Northern Wheatear Oenanthe oenanthe
Females were seen on Kessingland Beach and Lowestoft North Denes on the 1st. Another female was at Corton on the 3rd, and a male was in the M.o.D. field at Corton on the 8th.

Sedge Warbler Acrocephalus schoenobaenus
A single bird was singing near Kessingland Sewage Works, 1st and 3rd.

Blackcap
Sylvia atricapilla
A male was seen to fly in from out to sea at Ness Point on 1st April. A male at Kessingland Sewage Works on the same date may have been a new arrival as well. Single birds were at Corton sewage works and Arnold's Walk, Lowestoft, on the 2nd. A female was in Flycatcher Lane on the 3rd, with two on the 7th.

Willow Warbler Phylloscopus trochilus
Recorded at Kessingland Sewage Works (two) and Kensington Gardens, Lowestoft on the 1st. One was at Corton sewage works on the 2nd, and another in Flycatcher Lane on the 7th.

Firecrest
Regulus ignicapillus
Numbers seemed to have dropped slightly but were still present in Belle Vue Park (2), Kensington Gardens (2) and Kessingland sewage works (2) on the 1st April. One was still at Kessingland sewage works on the 3rd, and one was also at Warren Lane, Gorleston on the same day.

Jackdaw Corvus monedula, Rook C. frugilegus, Carrion Crow C. corone
Small numbers of all three species were passing south throughout the day, often at great height, on the 1st. All three species were again seen arriving off the sea on the 7th.

Siskin Carduelis spinus
Three flew south over Oxford Road, Lowestoft, on the 4th.

Linnet C. cannabina
Much smaller numbers than those seen the previous day were still on the move on April 1, with 65 on the Denes Oval on the 2nd April. Small numbers were again moving south on the 7th.

OTHER WILDLIFE
The warm weather at the beginning of April tempted several Small Tortoiseshell, Aglais urticae, Peacock, Inachis io, and two Comma, Polygonia c-album, and a Red Admiral, Vanessa atalanta, butterfly out of hibernation in the area, with large numbers of Bumblebees around as well.

 
Year 2000 Review Current News


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